Schindler's List

Schindler's List is a 1993 epic drama film directed and co-produced by Steven Spielberg and scripted by Steven Zaillian. It is based on the novel Schindler's Ark by Thomas Keneally, an Australian novelist. The film tells the story of Oskar Schindler, a German businessman who saved the lives of more than a thousand mostly Polish-Jewish refugees during the Holocaust by employing them in his factories. It stars Liam Neeson as Schindler, Ralph Fiennes as Schutzstaffel (SS)-officer Amon Göth, and Ben Kingsley as Schindler's Jewish accountant Itzhak Stern. John Williams composed the score.

Ideas for a film about the Schindlerjuden were proposed as early as 1963. Poldek Pfefferberg, one of the Schindlerjuden, made it his life's mission to tell the story of Schindler. When executive Sid Sheinberg sent a review of Schindler's Ark to Spielberg, the director was fascinated by the book. He eventually expressed enough interest for Universal Pictures to buy the rights to the novel. However, he was unsure about his own maturity about making a film about the Holocaust. Spielberg tried to pass on the projects to several other directors before finally deciding to direct the film himself after hearing of the various Holocaust denials.

Filming took place in Poland over the course of 72 days, in Kraków. Spielberg shot the film like a documentary, and decided not to use storyboards while shooting Schindler's List. Cinematographer Janusz Kamiński wanted to give a timeless sense to the film. Production designer Allan Starski made the sets darker or lighter than the people in the scenes, so they would not blend. The costumes had to be distinguished from skin tones or colors being used for the sets. In composing the score toSchindler's List, Williams hired violinist Itzhak Perlman to perform the film's main theme.

Schindler's List premiered on November 30, 1993 in Washington, D.C. and it was released on December 15, 1993 in the United States. Regarded as one of the greatest films ever made, it was a box office success and recipient of sevenAcademy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Director, and Best Original Score, as well as numerous other awards (sevenBAFTAs, three Golden Globes). In 2007, the American Film Institute ranked the film 8th on its list of the 100 best American films of all time (up one position from its 9th place listing on the 1998 list).

Oscars

Schindler's List won seven Oscars at the 66th Academy Awards, including Best Picture and Best Director. It was the first black and white film since The Apartment to win the Oscar for Best Picture. Liam Neeson and Ralph Fiennes were nominated for Best Actor and Best Supporting Actor respectively, but did not win. At the British Academy awards, the film won Best Film, the David Lean Award for Direction, Best Supporting Actor (Ralph Fiennes), Cinematography, Editing and Score. Schindler's List won Golden Globes for Best Motion Picture (Drama), Best Director and Best Screenplay, with John Williams awarded the Grammy for the film's musical score.

Academy Award

Awarded:

Best Picture Steven Spielberg
Gerald R. Molen
Branko Lustig
Best Director Steven Spielberg
Best Adapted Screenplay Steven Zaillian
Best Cinematography Janusz Kamiński
Best Art Direction Ewa Braun
Allan Starski
Best Film Editing Michael Kahn
Best Original Score John Williams

Nominated:

Best Actor Liam Neeson
Best Supporting Actor Ralph Fiennes
Best Costume Design Anna Biedrzycka Sheppard
Best Sound Andy Nelson
Steve Pederson
Scott Millan
Ron Judkins
Best Makeup Christina Smith
Matthew Mungle
Judy Alexander Cory

Golden Globe Award

Won

Best Motion Picture – Drama
Best Director
Best Screenplay

Nominated

Best Score
Best Supporting Actor – Motion Picture
Best Actor – Motion Picture Drama

American Film Institute recognition

1998 AFI's 100 Years...100 Movies—#9[48]
2003 AFI's 100 Years...100 Heroes and Villains:

Oskar Schindler—#13 Hero
Amon Göth—#15 Villain

AFI's 100 Years...100 Movie Quotes:

"The list is an absolute good. The list is life." – Nominated[49]

2006 AFI's 100 Years...100 Cheers—#3
2007 AFI's 100 Years...100 Movies (10th Anniversary Edition)—#8
2008 AFI's 10 Top 10—#3 Epic film

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